Citizenship in America and Europe: Beyond the Nation-State?

In Citizenship in America and Europe, scholars from both sides of the Atlantic consider how concepts of citizenship affect debates over immigration and assimilation, tolerance and minority rights, and national cohesion and civic culture. The authors explore the notion of “constitutional patriotism,” which seeks to establish principles of citizenship in a middle ground between cosmopolitanism and nationalism; the theoretical and practical questions of citizenship, including the complexities surrounding the legal status of citizenship in the European Union and the United States; the challenges of making EU citizenship “complementary” with national citizenship; and the issue of competing allegiances to home states and the European Union. Finally, the authors examine the centrality of rights, and the challenges of conflicting rights claims, in contemporary conceptions of citizenship. To what extent—if at all—should citizens’ rights and duties change as the nation-state itself changes?

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